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Union's finally gravitate to their natural level

For posting of generic news and event surrounding Labour Issues in Canada
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NC
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Union's finally gravitate to their natural level

Postby NC » Mon Mar 21, 2011 10:26 am

Fact is too often stranger than fiction.
Federal inmates seeking first raise in 25 years
Prisoners consider unionizing

By Rebecca Lindell, Postmedia News March 18, 2011
In Canada, crime pays. Just not very much.

That's why there's a movement from inside and outside of the prison walls to give Canada's federal inmates a raise.

Prisoners can get paid between $5.25 and $6.90 a day if they follow their correctional plans. Each of Canada's approximately 13,000 federal inmates gets one of these road maps to rehabilitation, which can include work programs, training and even conflict- management sessions.

And those wages could be subject to union negotiation if a group of inmates in a B.C. prison is successful in organizing Canada's first prison union, Confederation Prisoners' Labour Union, Local 001.

"They haven't had an increase in their wages in 25 years," said Natalie Dunbar, the criminal lawyer representing the inmates, who can work as mechanics, furniture makers, laundry staff and even haz-mat technicians. "The guys generally make, before deductions, $35 to $40, every two weeks and that's for 12 hours a day, generally six days a week."

But the movement begs the question what right do inmates have when it comes to getting paid in jail -a question that divides those who think wages should be bumped up, or for the sake of taxpayers, eliminated.
"It's an incentive to invite them to actively take part in their rehabilitation," said Suzanne Leclerc, spokeswomen for the Correctional Service.

Providing an incentive is redundant because parole boards assess participation, says John Hutton of the John Howard Society. A better goal would be giving prisoners a firm financial footing when they return to society, and that would require a raise, he says.

"It's not happening at these wages," says Hutton. "The amounts are so small I suspect there isn't a lot of budgeting or saving. People earn the money and then they spend it."

It costs the government approximately $101,000 to keep one inmate in prison for a year. Prisoners are responsible for paying for their own cable, phone calls, snacks, pens and paper, coffee, tea and even Aspirin. The government also deducts 10 per cent of an inmate's paycheque and deposits it into a savings account.

They should be paying for a lot more if they expect to get a wage, according to Kevin Gaudet, former federal director for the Canadian Taxpayers Federation. He says taxpayers already pay for rehabilitation programs and shouldn't have to pay prisoners to attend them.

"They want to get paid, then charge them room and board. They can't have it both ways," says Gaudet. "The adage that crime doesn't pay should be true."

© Copyright (c) The Province
The Province: http://www.theprovince.com/news/Federal ... story.html


:shock: :shock:


Find - Desiderata - read it

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Postby NC » Mon Mar 21, 2011 5:01 pm

I wonder what they will do for job action? Strike? What would a walk-out look like at a penitentiary? "I am not leaving my cell today, I'm on strike."

I predict a spike in the price of licence plates and bird houses.


Find - Desiderata - read it

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Postby alec » Wed Apr 20, 2011 8:02 pm

One minute your feeling down and the next minute you are right back up again.... :D


TWwho?


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